John Farnham’s Mayan Family (2014)

Photos © John Farnham 2014 http://www.johnfarnham.co.uk/ Soapstone, H25 cm x W34 cm x D20cm Inspired by his extensive travels, John Farnham’s direct carvings originate from cultural images, absorbed then seemingly forgotten until they are transformed into compact compositions in stone. John re-interprets figurative imagery to create distinctive sculptures. Mayan Family contrasts the masculinity and femininity of the historic peoples of Mesoamerica. The semi-abstract heroic male head is covered with a polished helmet, bearing confident linear incisions which convey forward movement along the horizontal plane. The partial view of the upper face intensifies the determined outward gaze. The female shields a…

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Elisabeth Frink’s Walking Madonna (1981)

In October 1981, the Dean of Salisbury Cathedral, Wiltshire, wrote to his parishioners to inform them that ‘a new resident will be observed in the Close.’1 The initially temporary figure subsequently became a permanent inhabitant of the genteel eighteenth-century Cathedral Close. At the centre of the Close is a sizable lawned square, surrounded by historic houses, including the Queen Anne period Mompesson House, which is now owned by the National Trust. Walking south towards the pale, pollution-tinged, Cathedral, along the east side of the Close, a substantial white painted gate stands ajar. Within the Cathedral grounds, set on a truncated…

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Antony Gormley’s Another Place (1997)

100 iron men stand on a beach. Gormley’s Another Place (1997) was intended as a temporary installation at Crosby Beach in Lancashire. Sefton Council controversially sought to remove these sculptures, however, such was their popularity that funding was raised privately by the South Sefton Development Trust to ensure that Another Place remained on permanent display.1 Known locally as ‘the Gormleys’ or the ‘Iron Men’, the site proved controversial, as environmentalists protested against the detrimental impact on marine life and wildlife, tourist damage, and the cost of mounting the rescue of those who risk the incoming tide and the dangerous soft…

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